Predicate Proposal CMO (Chief Marketing Officer)

CMO
Value statement: Knowledge of an organization’s CMO provides valuable insight into a business promotion strategy.
What does a Chief Marketing Officer do?
Develops an advertising business.
Leads the marketing department.
Responsible for representing the company in the media.
Responsible for the sale of the company.
Responsible for pricing.
Launches new products on the market with the team.
Conducts extensive research.
Responsible for service and customer service.
Definition: “Chief Marketing Officer, CMO) - a head belonging to the category of top management, top management of the enterprise. Determines the marketing strategy of the enterprise, makes decisions at the highest level, manages the work of the marketing service of the enterprise.“
Tooltip definition of the predicate: “The CMO of an organization”
Type of value: Entity
For enums - all possible values: N/A
of accepted values: One
Inverse Properties and Name: ‘CMO of’
Examples of proper use:
‘Apple’ → ‘CMO’ → ‘Greg “Joz” Joswiak’, citation:Apple Leadership - Greg Joswiak - Apple . This citation points to an official website Apple
Examples of improper use:
‘Apple’ → ‘CMO’ → ‘Greg “Joz” Joswiak’ citation: CMO 50: Greg Joswiak | Campaign US . While this is an official video that states Jeff Bezos is the CEO of Amazon, it is now outdated.
Usage in other schemas:
Usage in wikidata: chief executive officer - Wikidata 1
Usage in schema.org: N/A
Constraints: Entity should have value ‘is a’ → ‘Person’
Masculine/Feminine Form: N/A
Restrictions (ie PII concerns): N/A

CMO of

Value statement:
Knowledge of CMO allows you to predict the dynamics and vector of the company’s development.
Definition: “Chief Marketing Officer, CMO) - a head belonging to the category of top management, top management of the enterprise. Determines the marketing strategy of the enterprise, makes decisions at the highest level, manages the work of the marketing service of the enterprise.“
Tooltip definition of the predicate: “Organization a person is CMO of”
Type of value: Entity
For enums - all possible values: N/A
of accepted values: One
Inverse Properties and Name: ‘CMO’
Examples of proper use:
‘Greg “Joz” Joswiak’ → ‘CMO of’ → ‘Apple’, citation: :Apple Leadership - Greg Joswiak - Apple. This citation points to an official website Apple
Examples of improper use:
‘Greg “Joz” Joswiak’ → ‘CMO of’ → ‘Amazon’ citation:CMO 50: Greg Joswiak | Campaign US . . While this is an official video that states Jeff Bezos is the CEO of Amazon, it is now outdated.
Usage in other schemas:
Usage in wikidata: CMO of - Wikidata
Usage in schema.org: N/A
Constraints: Entity should have value ‘is a’ → ‘Organization’
Masculine/Feminine Form: N/A
Restrictions (ie PII concerns): N/A

1 Like

@lavvpix Good idea, and I like this proposal!

The only minor suggestion. The Definition looks great to me, but I think in the Value statement I would replace “marketing director” with “CMO (Chief Marketing Officer).” In many companies “marketing director” may not be a executive level/“C-suite” role. Here is a definition from the American Marketing Association for example (What Is the Difference Between the Role of the CMO and a Marketing Director?) : The Role of the CMO

See what you think. Otherwise I think this looks great, and will be valuable!

All encountered predicates were CMO (Chief Marketing Officer) and very rarely “marketing director”. If you leave “marketing director” then such triplets will be rejected very often ((((

Сorrected.

Generally we want to move away from having a separate predicate for each potential title in an organization - the exception to that probably being the CEO. It’s a slippery slope from a few CxO titles that make sense, to the next 100 CxO titles that various companies are making up / using. And then after that, what about the VP roles, etc?

Our current intention is to capture the roles that individuals are filling with qualifiers. So:

  • {$PersonA} → [employed at] → {$CompanyA} with the qualifier → [job title] → {CwhateverO}

This is fundamentally more sustainable than an individual predicate for hundreds of different jobs.

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@jed @leeds @jen Very often there are job titles that can be interpreted in different ways. If we want to get away from the additional creation of positions, I suggest adding, for example, "CEO of (President, General Director). "СEO (Chairman, Independent Director) . If this proposal is supported, I will create a detailed proposal. Now participants are trying not to add this category, since with a high degree of probability the validators will reject it if it is written not “CEO of” but “General Director”. I propose to add by listing here 2022-10-05 225929

Examples of positions that cannot be attributed to the current predicates due to the high risk of rejection by validators
2022-10-05 225635

2022-10-05 225702

I think what you’re talking about is substantially different than what is commonly referred to with the CEO title.

The CEO is a full-time, executive role at a company, whom the entire company effectively reports to.

I believe some of these examples (specifically “Chairman, Independent Director”) would not fall under the CEO definition because Independent Director maps to being a Member of the Board of Directors. And in the screenshots whenever I see “Non-executive” that also maps to someone that only spends a small part of their time with a company, and thus isn’t CEO.

Therefore, it is necessary to introduce unambiguity in the interpretation of positions - either by adding new ones, or by indicating the listing in the current “CEO” “CEO of” “Boarding Director”

So what we’ve been thinking on this front is that instead of having an individual predicate with the title of the role, it would be a free text field instead.

So instead of:
{$CompanyX} <-[CEO] ← {$PersonA} (Person A is the CEO of CompanyX)

it would instead start with:
{$CompanyX} <-[employed at] ← {$PersonA} (Person A is employed at CompanyX)
and after using a qualifier:
{$CompanyX} <-[employed at] ← {$PersonA} <-[job title] ← {$SomeString} (Person A is employed at CompanyX with the job title of “SomeString”)
And “SomeString” could be general like “Chief Marketing Officer”, or something very specific like “Director- Cloud, Data & AI Sales Lead Europe”

3 Likes

Yes, this is the best solution! Thanks!

1 Like